Monthly Archives: April 2016

April 1: Columbine

“Folly. Cuckoldry and deserted love.” These are the sentiments conveyed by today’s flower, Columbine. Aquilegia also goes by the common name Granny’s Bonnet. The genus name derives from the Latin word for eagle, aquila. The shape of the flower petals were thought … Continue reading

Posted in Language of Flowers | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

March 31: Love-Lies-Bleeding

The flower of the day is Love-Lies-Bleeding, which in the language of flowers represents “Desertion. Hopelessness.” Amaranthus caudatus also goes by the monikers velvet flower, tassel flower, and foxtail amaranth. Perhaps the common name is best-known today through Sir Elton … Continue reading

Posted in Language of Flowers | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

March 30: Hoarhound

More often referred to as Horehound in modern times, today’s flower conveys the meaning “Imitation” in the language of flowers. Some say the Latin name Marrubium vulgare derived from the Hebrew word marrob, meaning “bitter juice”, and contend that Horehound was one … Continue reading

Posted in Language of Flowers | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

March 29: Elder

Today’s flower, the Elder, represents the sentiments “Compassion. Humility and kindness,” in the language of flowers. The lovely Sambucas flower and fruit are prized ingredients in both herbal preparations and culinary creations. Hollowed elderberry twigs are the traditional spiles used for tapping … Continue reading

Posted in Language of Flowers | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

March 28: Sweet Briar

Today’s flower is the Sweet Briar Rose, also called Eglantine. In the language of flowers, it conveys the meanings of “Poetry.  Simplicity. I wound to heal. Decrease of love.” Rosa eglanteria, or R. rubginosa, has been a favorite in literature from Chaucer … Continue reading

Posted in Language of Flowers | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

March 27: Fir Tree

The Fir Tree represents “Elevation” in the Language of Flowers. As they grow primarily in mountainous areas, this makes sense. The 1845 story by Hans Christian Anderson, “The Fir Tree”, opens with these lines: “Far down in the forest, where … Continue reading

Posted in Language of Flowers | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

March 26: Pitch Pine

In the language of flowers, the Pitch Pine stands for “Philosophy.” Pinus rigida is found mostly in the eastern United States, and is the primary species found in the New Jersey Pine Barrens. In earlier times, the Pitch Pine was … Continue reading

Posted in Language of Flowers | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

March 25: Allspice

In the language of flowers, Allspice conveys the feeling of “Languishing.” Allspice is the dried, unripe fruit of the Pimenta dioica tree. Carolina allspice and Japanese allspice are fragrant, albeit unrelated, shrubs. The herb Costmary is sometimes called by the common … Continue reading

Posted in Language of Flowers | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

March 24: Fern

The Fern signifies “Sincerity; Magic; Fascination; Confidence; Shelter” in the language of flowers. There are twelve thousand species of ferns, vascular plants that have neither seeds nor flowers, reproducing via spores. Some ferns are excellent examples of evolutionary stasis. For example, Osmunda … Continue reading

Posted in Language of Flowers | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

March 23: Woodbine

Today’s flower, Woodbine, might be more recognizable by its common American name, Virginia Creeper. In the language of flowers, it signifies “Fraternal Love”. The Latin name, Parthenocissus, derives from the Greek words partheno–meaning “virgin”–and kissos, which was Latinized to cissus, and means “ivy”. Many … Continue reading

Posted in Language of Flowers | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment